Seeing Our Way Through – April 17 2020

Seeing Our Way Through – April 17 2020

Let no man pull you so low as to hate him.

Martin Luther King Jr., 

A Knock at Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

I will permit no man to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.

Booker T. Washington

 

The only thing that ever is going on is evolution. This is a primary truth of nature, the truth that underlies everything in this relative world. Regardless of the fear, discomfort or anger that any person, place, situation or event may cause in us, evolution – movement forward – is being served.

 

Our political climate today is one built on fear and the visceral human need to find the cause of that fear. ‘It’s them. They are doing it to us. Before, it was ‘build a wall.’ Now it’s ‘Chinese virus.’ All of it is fear of ‘other.’

 

How can we possibly see the triumph of racism, xenophobia and misogyny as evolution?

 

These traits are not new to our culture. But we’ve been able to pretend they are far less prevalent than they are, pretend we’re really not that way. In order for healing even to begin, there must be an acknowledgement of the problem. Here, now, we can have that acknowledgement. And now we must find the healing. 

 

Separation leads only to further separation. Embodying fear can lead only to the experience of more fear. We cannot fight our way to peace. We cannot hate our way to love. We cannot separate ourselves into the experience of oneness.

 

And the experience of oneness is what all of us – on ALL sides of this world mess – are seeking. For only in that oneness may we find a truly lasting sense of peace and safety.

 

Today each of us must find a belief in something greater than fear, desperation and the sense of looming death, or hell on earth. The clouds of fear and hate may obscure the sun, but they do not remove it. We must remember it is there. We must live in a world based upon its sure and certain return.

 

Today I will see past all opinions and voices, in myself and in my fellows, past all blame and despair to that truth of oneness that lies beneath. I will, for at least one moment, drop out of the speculating mind and into the beautiful discomfort of life itself. Into this moment, as frightening and uncomfortable as it might be. And I will lean into that discomfort as if my very life, and the lives of those I love, depends on it.

Moksha and wall, tintype, DTLA Photo Studio